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City Guide : Tehran

Placed at the north-central part of the country, Tehran is the capital and the most populous city of Iran. The capital sprawls at the foot of Alborz Mountain. Tehran is the industrial, economical, political, cultural and population center of Iran. Having a vast highway network, the city is the focus of the railway network of Iran. Tehran is the seat of the Parliament of Iran.

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  • Tourist Attractions

    Tehran is grateful with its palaces, museums, squares, parks and gardens. The closeness of the mountains to the city transforms Tehran into a ski oasis.

    Golestan (Rose Garden) Palace being a Qajar architecture is one of the significant and most visited attractions in the capital. The palace within a garden is composed of several buildings including the best museums in Iran. Ivan-e Takht-e Marmar (Marble Throne Verandah) harboring an alabaster throne, Shams-Al Emarat (Edifice of the Sun) and Negar Khane are among these museums.

    Niavaran Place Complex placed at the north of the city is composed of several buildings and a museum. This complex comprises Sahebqaraniyeh Palace from the time of Qajar dynasty.

    Located at the Azadi Square, Azadi Tower stands as one of the symbols of the city. This monument placed at the city entrance was built in 1971 to commemorate the 2500th anniversary of the Persian Empire. At the upstairs of the tower, Azadi Museum is home to a collection of art and archaeological pieces.

    With a height of 5.678 m, Mount Damavand is the highest peak of the country. This extinct volcano is covered with snow for a long part of the year.

    Placed on a garden of 7.000 m2, Glass and Ceramics Museum is one of the most magnificent museums in the country. Accompanied by English descriptions, the collection inside will allure you. Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art is one of the most impressive and valuable museums in Iran. It is admired as one of the wealthiest collections of Europe outside the continent. Also, there are a great deal of more museums in Tehran such as National Jewels Museum, Archeology Museum and Carpet Museum.

    Kavir National Park, Chitgar Park, Laleh Park, Jamshidieh Park and Niavaran Park are some examples of the city's open space fields.
  • Culture & Entertainment

    Persian carpet has a worldwide reputation. This artistic glory has a history tracing back to 2.500 before. The country is the pioneer of the ancient civilizations in terms of carpet weaving. This local art is the product of creativity and ingenuity.

    The City Theater (Theatre-e Shahr) is the main theatrical center of the city. Every year, International Theater Festival is held to show the world the cultural accumulation of the city and the country.

    Tehran International Exhibitions Company organizes a great deal of fairs and exhibitions in Tehran. It is placed at the city's fairground.

    Tehran is the leading education center of Iran. There are 10s of colleges and universities in the city. Built in 1851, Dar al-Funun was the first contemporary institution of higher learning in Persia. Then, it was transformed into the University of Tehran. Tehran University is the oldest and the largest state university of Iran.

    Tehran stands at the foot of Alborz Mountain. The mountain is home to many ski resorts. While climbing and a magnificent journey to the mountain via Tochal Gondola Lift are splendid entertainments Dizn Ski Resort is the best area for skiing.
  • Food & Drink

    The Iranian and Persian cuisines dominate the city's culinary culture. Also, the international flavors and fast food are existed in the city. Soup, rice, chicken, lamb, salad and pickle, meat, desserts and vegetarian palates play a significant role in the city cuisine. Also, the city is popular with its kebabs.

    The Iranian cuisine;

    Soups: The ingredients of the local soups are mainly meat (lamb) and vegetables. Popular examples: Aabgoosht, Aash-e Anaar, Aash-e Reshteh, Aash-e Sholeh Qalamkar, Aash-e Aaloo, Aash-e Gojeh Farangi...

    Desserts: Baagh-lava, Samanoo, Halva, Sholeh Zard, Yakh Dar Behesht, Qotaab, Sohaan-e Asali, Ranginak...

    Lamb and beef: Kabab Hosseini, Taas Kabab, Kabab Barg, Kabab Chenjeh, Kabab Koobideh
    Khoresht-e Baamieh, Khoresht-e Qormeh Sabzi...
  • Shopping

    Bazaars are the best places for shopping in Tehran. Persian rugs stand first on the list of shopping at these bazaars. Glasses, ceramics, silks, embroidery goods, antiques, different kinds of miniatures, silver and gold-wares, enamel works and the other handicrafts are the examples from the local shopping world.

    Tehran's Grand Bazaar is one of the world's largest bazaars. The hearth of the economic life of Tehran highly pulsates at this bazaar. A high portion of the retail sector of the city is placed at the streets of this bazaar. This market place has many entrances and the shopping world of it is diversified. Watches, jewels, groceries and a great deal more are found at this magnificent location.
Route Map: New York – Tehran Flight

The Silk Road by Bicycle

When I cross from Iran into Turkmenistan I have a tough road ahead of me: 500 km of asphalt into Turkmenistan’s Karakum desert. Temperatures are above 55 C. The headwind is terrible: it brings in it much sand and this week it has been stronger than usual. I make good progress in the early hours, but at midmorning the wind starts to be unbearable. I decide to ride at night.  I try to see it as the epitome of adventure traveling and I think of Alexandra David-Néel and my fascination with her journey to Lasha in 1927, traveling only by night in order not to be discovered and be able to progress across mystical Tibet, at the time forbidden to foreigners.

Near the Oxus the desert ends, and Uzbekistan, with its historical cities begins. Bukhara stuns me; it goes beyond my expectations developed on several years of daydreaming through exotic readings. The myriad mosques and madrassahs, the archways of the bazaars, the backstreets of the old city retain the charm of an epoch now gone. There are few cars, few noises, no shops with neon lights. There is harmony; even hearing the different languages from tourist groups is a reminder of how cosmopolitan this place was, full of Jews, Afghans, Armenians, Russians, Persians, Chinese and Hindus. I leave Bukhara with anticipation as I am setting off to meet what I have been idealizing for years: the city of Samarkand. My Ancient Rome ancestors used to say: “Nomen est omen”, it is all in the name. Samarkand is the ultimate destination for lovers of epic journeys; for anyone who spent nights awake reading Jules Verne, Rudyard Kipling, Emilio Salgari, and dreaming of exotic countries. It is because how it sounds. Just say it: Sa-mar-kand. It awakes the imagination and the lust for travels. Timbuctu, Maracaibo, Zanzibar have magic in their name too, putting a spell on travelers to attract them for life.  To make the journey to Samarkand is to graduate as a seasoned traveler.    

Leaving Samarkand marks the beginning of the mountains. After much desert, the road will start ascending, with much ups and downs. I will cross the Pamirs, the roof of the world, where the mighty mountain ranges of Asia generate: over 40,000m of positive elevations trough Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, before I reach Kashgar in China, roughly five times ascending Mt Everest.

The most memorable moments in this trip has been my night in local households . Every day, at around six in the afternoon, when men are heading back home after working in the fields or taking care of their small business ventures in the villages, I start my search for food and shelter. I call it generating benevolence: it entails finding a human being and having him willing to draw on the basic human values of hospitality and assistance by way of sympathy, necessity and interest. Abdullo, in a cotton-field village near the border between  Uzbekistan and Tajikistan, cut grapes from his vine as soon as I arrive, Dr Shadman, the pharmacist in the mountain village of Boysun, south of Samarkand, went to the bazaar to buy meat, Pisando, near the summit of the Kabukabot pass in Tajikistan, walked to the house of his neighbor to get a watermelon, Najiba, at the Pamiri village across the river from Afghanistan, opened the home made syrup of apricot and strawberry reserved for special occasions. Often my host calls his relatives or friends to parade me as a subject of exotic interest, proud of me staying in his home. Women would prepare a special meal, sometimes very simple and modest but still out of the ordinary for my host. At down breakfast is prepared with tea, bread and biscuits. I leave some money which is promptly refused at first but later accepted and the family sees me off after giving me something for the road such as few tomatoes, cucumbers, nuts or the dried fruits of the mulberry tree. Generating benevolence results in comfort, the warmth feeling of being given intimacy and the intellectual satisfaction of seeing something more than the surface.

Andrea Oschetti, is an Italian living in Hong Kong. In 2008 he crowned his management consulting career by finding the strength to leave the corporate world, follow his passions and re-invent himself as a private chef, a photographer and an explorer. His journeys can be followed at www.fioreblu.com

Ticket Sales Offices : Tehran

Sales Office
Address Turkish Airlines In. 2nd Floor, Negar Tower, Valiasr Ave. , Vanak Sq. , Tehran, Iran
Phone Call Center (Tehran): +98 21 23546
Fax +98 21 88641909
Telex THRTZTK
E-Mail reservation.thr@thy.com
Work Hours

Weekdays 08:30-16:30 / Thursday: 08:30-12:30

Saturday 08:30-16:30

The weekend is Friday. Office are closed on Friday.
Ramadan : Weekdays: 09:00 - 16:00 (Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday)
Thursday: 09:00 - 12:30
On Friday, Closed.

TK
Address IMAM KHOMEYNI INT.AIRPORT (IKA)
Phone +98 (21) 55 67 83 30
Fax +98 (21) 55 67 83 28
Telex
E-Mail station.thr@thy.com
Work Hours

Weekdays 23:30-01:30

CARGO
Address THY
Phone +98 (21) 55 67 83 10
Fax +98 (21) 55 67 83 11
Telex
E-Mail cargo.thr@thy.com
Work Hours

Weekdays 08:30-16:30 / Thursday: 08:30-12:30

Saturday 08:30-16:30

The weekend is Friday. Office are closed on Friday.

NAFIS TARABAR
Address Nr 124 3.Shahap BLDG Navab Hw TEHRAN
Phone 44666724 / +98 2155678310-11
Fax
Telex
E-Mail thrcargo@thy.com
Work Hours  
HOMA EXPRESS CARGO
Address 1. Unit west No.53 Molla Sadra Ave. After Kordestan Bridge Vanak Square TEHRAN
Phone 9125203832 / +98 2155678310-11
Fax
Telex
E-Mail thrcargo@thy.com
Work Hours  
  • Tehran : Airport Information

    Imam Khomeini Airport

    Address : Tehran Imam Khomeini International 30km south of Tehran Iran
    Phone :
  • Tehran : Airport Map Information

Tehran Hotels
Tehran Info
Saturday
GMT
  • Sat 37°C
  • Sun 34°C
  • Mon 34°C
Aug Sep Oct Nov
36°C 32°C 25°C 16°C
25°C 21°C 15°C 8°C
All for the Year Monthly Averages
Area : 1.500 km²
Population : 14.000.000
Monetary Unit : Iranian Rial
Phone Code : 98 21
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